The social contract in "Leviathan" by Thomas Hobbes and "Two Treatises of Government" by John Locke PDF

Warning, this page may be too large for some browsers. This appendix lists direct English translations of Latin phrases. This list is a combination of the three divided pages, the social contract in "Leviathan" by Thomas Hobbes and "Two Treatises of Government" by John Locke PDF users who have no trouble loading large pages and prefer a single page to scroll or search through. Or „at will“, „at one’s pleasure“.


Författare: Anonym.
Essay aus dem Jahr 2016 im Fachbereich Politik – Grundlagen und Allgemeines, , Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: In this paper, I am going to compare John Locke’s and Thomas Hobbes‘ different ideas about the social contract. The social contract is a theory, which should describe the relationship between a government and the individual. Already in the antiquity, Epicure, Lucretius and Cicero were writing about the theory of the social contract. In the age of enlightenment, there were again several people such as Hobbes, Locke or Rousseau writing about the social contract.
Regarding these different theories, I am going to tackle the following questions: How do the social contract theories in "Leviathan" and "Two Treatise of Government" differ? Where are Hobbes‘ and Locke’s ideas realized in the present? Where were Hobbes‘ and Locke’s ideas realized in history?
I will work out some points in which these two theories differ and take a look where they are realized nowadays, and where they were realized in history.
In Addition, I will provide a short biography for both Hobbes and Locke. This biography is intended to give us a better understanding of the backgrounds of these two political philosophers.

Or „from heaven all the way to the center of the earth“. In law, can refer to the obsolete cuius est solum eius est usque ad coelum et ad inferos maxim of property ownership. Equally a pedibus usque ad caput. Equivalent to „on the contrary“ or „au contraire“. An argumentum a contrario is an „argument from the contrary“, an argument or proof by contrast or direct opposite.

Loosely, „even more so“ or „with even stronger reason“. Often used to lead from a less certain proposition to a more evident corollary. Similar to the English expressions „from tip to toe“ or „from top to toe“. See also ab ovo usque ad mala. Used in mathematics and logic to denote something that is known after a proof has been carried out. In philosophy, used to denote something that can be known from empirical experience. Presupposed, the reverse of a posteriori.

Used in mathematics and logic to denote something that is known or postulated before a proof has been carried out. In philosophy, used to denote something that can be known without empirical experience. In everyday speech, it denotes something occurring or being known before the event. Inferences regarding something’s use from its misuse are invalid. Literally, „from the everlasting“ or „from eternity“.

Thus, „from time immemorial“, „since the beginning of time“ or „from an infinitely remote time in the past“. In theology, often indicates something, such as the universe, that was created outside of time. Or, having to do with correspondence. A legal term meaning „from without“. More literally, „from the deepest chest“. Can mean „with deepest affection“ or „sincerely“.

New Latin for „based on unsuitability“, „from inconvenience“ or „from hardship“. Thus, „from the beginning“ or „from infancy“. Incunabula is commonly used in English to refer to the earliest stage or origin of something, and especially to copies of books that predate the spread of the printing press around AD 1500. At the outset“, referring to an inquiry or investigation. In law, refers to something being the case from the start or from the instant of the act, rather than from when the court declared it so. By a person who is angry.

Used in law to describe a decision or action that is detrimental to those it affects and was made based on hatred or anger, rather than on reason. From the origin, beginning, source, or commencement—i. The source of the word aboriginal. Refers to situations where a single example or observation indicates a general or universal truth. Refers to the founding of Rome, which occurred in 753 BC according to Livy’s count. Used as a reference point in ancient Rome for establishing dates, before being supplanted by other systems. In law, refers to the principle that someone who is not present is unlikely to inherit.