The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression PDF

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Författare: Amity Shlaes.
The New York Times bestseller from one of the nation’s most respected economic commentators, now in a handsomely illustrated edition that brings to life the faces of a nation in peril

Follow the link for more information. Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the novel. Cover of the first edition in 1925. I Romanzi della Palma Mondadori 1936. The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional towns of West Egg and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922.

Fitzgerald—inspired by the parties he had attended while visiting Long Island’s North Shore—began planning the novel in 1923, desiring to produce, in his words, „something new—something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned. Fitzgerald died in 1940, believing himself to be a failure and his work forgotten. Set on the prosperous Long Island of 1922, The Great Gatsby provides a critical social history of America during the Roaring Twenties within its fictional narrative. Today, there are a number of theories as to which mansion was the inspiration for the book. One possibility is Land’s End, a notable Gold Coast Mansion where Fitzgerald may have attended a party. Many of the events in Fitzgerald’s early life are reflected throughout The Great Gatsby.

Sarah Churchwell speculates that parts of the ending of The Great Gatsby were based on the Hall-Mills Case. In the summer of 1922, Nick Caraway, a Yale graduate and veteran of the Great War from the Midwest—who serves as the novel’s narrator—takes a job in New York as a bond salesman. Nick eventually receives an invitation to one of Gatsby’s parties. Nick encounters Jordan Baker at the party and they meet Gatsby himself, an aloof and surprisingly young man who recognizes Nick because they were in the same division in the Great War.

Having developed a budding friendship with Nick, Gatsby uses him to arrange a reunion between himself and Daisy. Nick invites Daisy to have tea at his house without telling her that Gatsby will also be there. After an initially awkward reunion, Gatsby and Daisy begin an affair over the summer. At a luncheon at the Buchanan estate, Daisy speaks to Gatsby with such undisguised intimacy that Tom realizes she is in love with Gatsby.

On the way back, Gatsby’s car strikes and kills Tom’s mistress, Myrtle. Nick later learns from Gatsby that Daisy, not Gatsby himself, was driving the car at the time of the accident. Myrtle’s husband, George Wilson, falsely concludes that the driver of the yellow car is the secret lover he suspects his wife had. George learns during his confrontation with Tom that the yellow car is Jay Gatsby’s, fatally shoots Gatsby, and then turns the gun on himself. He also serves as the first-person narrator of the novel.

He is Gatsby’s next-door neighbor and a bond salesman. He is easy-going, occasionally sarcastic, and somewhat optimistic, although this latter quality fades as the novel progresses. According to Some Sort of Epic Grandeur, Matthew J. Scott Fitzgerald, the character is based on the bootlegger and former World War officer, Max Gerlach.