Die Kunst, 1905, Vol. 11 PDF

German Realist artist noted for drawings, etchings, and paintings. His popularity in his native country, owing especially to history painting, was such that few of his major paintings left Germany, as many were die Kunst, 1905, Vol. 11 PDF acquired by museums in Berlin. Although he traveled in order to find subjects for his art, to visit exhibitions, and to meet with other artists, Menzel spent most of his life in Berlin, and was, despite numerous friendships, by his own admission detached from others.


Författare: Unknown Author.

It is likely that he felt socially estranged for physical reasons alone—Menzel had a large head, and stood about four foot six inches. Berlin published his first work in 1833, an album of pen-and-ink drawings reproduced on stone, to illustrate Goethe’s little poem, Kunstlers Erdenwallen. In the meantime, Menzel had also begun to study, unaided, the art of painting, and he soon produced a great number and variety of pictures. His paintings consistently demonstrated keen observation and honest workmanship in subjects dealing with the life and achievements of Frederick the Great, and scenes of everyday life, such as In the Tuileries, The Ball Supper, and At Confession. During Menzel’s life, his paintings were appreciated by Otto von Bismarck and William I, and after his death they were appropriated for use as electoral posters by Adolf Hitler.

If these historical illustrations anticipated the qualities of early Impressionism, it is paintings such as The French Window and The Palace Garden of Prince Albert, both painted in the mid- 1840s, that now appeal as „among the most freely observed of mid-nineteenth century images. In a word, the man is everywhere independent, sincere, with sure vision, a decisive note that can sometimes be a little brutal. While being perfectly healthy he has the neurosis of truthfulness. The man who has measured with a compass the buttons on a uniform from the time of Frederick, when it is a matter of depicting a modern shoe, waistcoat, or coiffure, does not make them by approximations but totally, in their absolute form and without smallness of means.